The Lombardi Trophy (5)

Retired Jersey #79

All-American; 1971, 1972

1972 Lombardi Award 

1972 Outland Trophy 

1972: Rich Glover, Middle Guard (1970-1972)

Jersey City, NJ 

 

     One of the finest defensive players in Nebraska and college football history, Rich Glover anchored the Husker defense during the early 1970s, helping Nebraska capture back-to-back national titles in 1970 and 1971 under Coach Bob Devaney.

     A 1995 inductee into the College Football Hall of Fame, Glover was a three-year letter winner, who earned consensus All-America honors in 1971 and 1972 and finished third in Heisman Trophy voting in 1972. The 6-foot-1, 235-pound middle guard is one of only 10 players in college football history to win both the Lombardi and Outland Trophies, the awards that are given to the top interior player and top lineman in the country, respectively, in the same season, sweeping the awards in 1972. His jersey (No. 79) was retired following the 1972 season.

     As a senior, Glover earned Big Eight Defensive Player-of-the-Year honors, helping the Huskers to a 9-2-1 record and a 40-6 victory over Notre Dame in the Orange Bowl. He finished the season with 100 tackles, including 52 solos, and nine tackles for 41 yards lost, as the Huskers led the Big Eight in total defense and ranked in the top 10 nationally in total defense, scoring defense and pass defense.

A Jersey City, N.J., native, Glover played an instrumental part in the Huskers? 1971 national championship, earning All-Big Eight and All-America honors as Nebraska won its second straight national title with a 13-0 record. He is best remembered for his performance against Oklahoma in the ?Game of the Century? when he made 22 stops in the Huskers? 35-31 victory over the second-ranked Sooners. In 1971, Glover led Nebraska with 92 tackles, including 46 solo stops, and 13 tackles for 73 yards lost. He saw limited action in 1970 as a sophomore, recording 19 tackles and three tackles for 13 yards lost.

     Following his collegiate career, he was drafted in the third round (No. 69 overall) of the 1973 NFL Draft by the New York Giants. He played with the Giants for one season before joining the Shreveport Steamers of the World Football League in 1974. He finished his career with the Philadelphia Eagles in 1975 and 1976. 

 

 

 

Defense

Year

UT

AT

TT

TFL

BK

PBU

PI

1970

5

14

19

3-13

0

3

0

1971

46

46

92

13-73

0

1

0

1972

52

48

100

9-41

0

2

0

Totals

103

108

211

25-127

0

6

0


Retired Jersey #50

All-American; 1981, 1982

1981 & 1982 Outland Trophy 

1982 Lombardi Award 

1981: Dave Rimington, Center (1979-1982)

Omaha, NE

 

     The only player ever to win the Outland Trophy in consecutive years (1981 and 1982), Dave Rimington is one of the most decorated offensive linemen in college football history.

     The 6-foot-3, 290-pound center was a two-time first-team All-American in 1981 and 1982 and is one of just 13 Huskers to have his jersey retired. He was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1997, while his No. 50 jersey was retired by Nebraska in 1982.

     A three-time first-team All-Big Eight choice from 1980 to 1982, Rimington was named the Big Eight Offensive Player of the Year in 1981, marking the only time in conference history that a lineman has earned the prestigious honor. During his career, the Omaha South grad helped the Huskers win back-to-back Big Eight titles in 1981 and 1982, as Nebraska led the nation in rushing during his senior season.

     A four-year letterman and three-year starter, Rimington was named team captain and capped his senior season by winning the 1982 Lombardi Award. Also, a two-time first-team academic All-American, Rimington was honored by the NCAA as a Top-Five Student-Athlete and was selected as a National Football Foundation and College Football Hall of Fame Scholar-Athlete in 1982. He was also a three-time first-team academic All-Big Eight choice from 1980 to 1982. In 1999, he was selected to the Walter Camp All-Century team.

     A first-round draft choice of the Cincinnati Bengals in 1983, Rimington played five seasons with the Bengals, and played two seasons with the Philadelphia Eagles before retiring in 1989.

     Rimington is the president of the Boomer Esiason Foundation and resides in New York. In 2000, the first Rimington Award sponsored by the Boomer Esiason Foundation to honor college football's center of the year was presented to Nebraska center Dominic Raiola, whose jersey No. 54 was retired in 2002.


Retried Jersey #71

All-American 1983

1983 Lombardi Award 

1983 Outland Trophy 

1983: Dean Steinkuhler, Offensive Guard (1981-1983)

Burr, NE 

 

     Among the top offensive linemen ever to play at Nebraska, Dean Steinkuhler anchored a line that paved the way for the nation's leading rushing offense in 1983 before sweeping the top awards presented to linemen.

     As a senior that season, Steinkuhler won both the Lombardi Award and Outland Trophy, awarded to the outstanding interior player and top lineman in the country, respectively. He helped create holes for Heisman Trophy winner Mike Rozier, who became only the second player in NCAA history to rush for 2,000 yards in a season in 1983.

     Steinkuhler's No. 71 jersey, along with Rozier's No. 30 jersey, was retired following the 1983 season, in which the Huskers ran for an average of 401.7 yards-per game, while also leading the nation in scoring, averaging 52.0 points per contest.

     Steinkuhler was named to nearly every All-American list in 1983, giving his hometown of Burr (population 110) the distinction of being the smallest town at the time to ever produce a consensus All-American.

     As a junior in 1982, Steinkuhler played side-by-side with three All-Big Eight selections (Dave Rimington, Mike Mandelko and Randy Theiss) before earning the honor himself the following year.

     Following a stellar senior season, Steinkuhler became the highest-drafted Husker linemen ever, when the Houston Oilers selected him as the second pick in the 1984 NFL Draft. Steinkuhler played eight seasons with the Houston Oilers before retiring following the 1991 season. Steinkuhler followed fellow Husker Irving Fryar in the draft, marking only the second time in NFL history, and the first since 1967, that the top two players were from the same school. 


IMAGE

Retired Jersey #98

All-American; 1996, 1997

1997 Lombardi Award 

 

1997: Grant Wistrom, Rush End (1994-1997)

Webb City, MO

 

     One of the most feared defenders in school history, Grant Wistrom was the anchor of the Husker defense during one of the most successful eras in college football. During his career, the Huskers compiled a 49-2 record from 1994 to 1997, winning three national titles in that span (1994, 1995 and 1997), becoming only the second program in Division I history to win three national titles in a four-year period.

     A two-time first-team All-American, Wistrom became Nebraska's fourth Lombardi Award winner as the nation's top lineman following the 1997 season. Wistrom, who holds the school record for tackles for loss with 58.5 for 260 yards and ranks second with 26.5 sacks, had his No. 98 retired during the 1998 season.

As a senior captain, the 6-foot-5 inch, 255-pound rush end from Webb City, Mo., finished with 51 tackles, including 8.5 sacks and 17 tackles for loss, leading the Blackshirts in both categories en route to earning Big 12 Defensive Player-of-the-Year honors. A finalist for the Bronko Nagurski Defensive Player of the Year, Wistrom helped the Huskers rank fifth nationally in total defense and second nationally against the run. He led Nebraska to a perfect 13-0 record and a share of the national title with Michigan.

     In 1996, Wistrom was named the Big 12 Defensive Player of the Year, helping NU to top-10 rankings in all four major defensive categories. A first-team All-American and finalist for the Nagurski Award, Wistrom finished third on the team in tackles with 75, while leading the Huskers in both sacks (9.5-48 yards lost) and tackles for loss (20-74).

     A third-team All-American as a sophomore, Wistrom recorded 44 stops, including a team-leading 15 tackles for loss, as Nebraska went 12-0 and repeated as national champions. He also had four sacks, earning first-team All-Big Eight honors as NU ranked second nationally against the rush, fourth in points allowed and 13th in total defense. During his freshman campaign, Wistrom made his presence known, earning Big 12 Newcomer-of-the-Year honors in helping the Huskers to their first national title since 1971. He played in all 13 games, recording 36 stops and 4.5 sacks, as one of only two true Husker freshmen to see time.

     Wistrom was a two-time first-team GTE/CoSIDA Academic All-American and became the 13th Husker to win the NCAA's highest honor, the NCAA Top Eight Award, in 1997. He also earned the National Football Foundation and College Football Hall of Fame Postgraduate Scholarship following his senior campaign and was the Big 12 Male Athlete of the Year for the 1997-98 season.

     A first-round selection (No. 6 overall) by the St. Louis Rams in the 1998 NFL Draft, Wistrom played a reserve role as a rookie before earning a starting position in helping the Rams win the Super Bowl in 2000.

 

Defense

.

.(---Tackles---)

.

Fum.

.

.

.

QB

Int.

Year

G/S

UT

AT

TT

TFL

Sacks

C-R

BK

PBU

PI

Hry.

Csd.

1994

12/0

14

22

36

6.5-55

4.5-49

0-0

0

0

0

11

0

1995

11/11

21

23

44

15-55

4-23

0-0

0

0

0

13

1

1996

12/12

30

45

75

20-74

9.5-48

1-0

2

0

1

15

4

1997

12/12

28

23

51

17-76

8.5-58

3-1

0

3

3

25

0

Totals

47/35

93

113

206

58.5-260

26.5-178

4-1

2

3

1

64

5


All-American, 2009

2009 AP Player of the Year

2009 Bednarik Award

2009 Nagurski Trophy

2009 Lombardi Award 

2009 Outland Trophy 

2009 Bill Willis Award

2009: Ndamukong Suh, Defensive Tackle (2006-2009)

Portland, OR

 

     Ndamukong Suh became one of the most honored defensive players in college football history in 2009. Suh led a dominating Nebraska defense and his play resulted in accolades on the team, conference and national level. His senior season capped a highly productive career for the 6-4, 300-pound Suh that left him near the top of numerous Nebraska defensive charts. The honors captured by Suh during his senior season included the following:

- He was the first defensive player to win the Associated Press College Player of the Year Award since the inception of the honor in 1998.

- Suh was the first defensive tackle invited to the Heisman ceremonies in New York since Warren Sapp in 1994. Suh's fourth-place finish in the voting tied for the best by a defensive lineman since Nebraska's Rich Glover was third in 1972. Suh also received the highest-ever point total for a fourth-place finisher and his 161 first-place votes were the most ever for an interior defensive lineman.

- Suh won the Outland Trophy for the nation's top interior lineman, giving Nebraska a nation-leading nine Outland winners (eight players). No other school has won more than five Outlands. Suh was the first Husker to win the award since offensive guard Aaron Taylor in 1997.

- Suh won the Rotary Lombardi Award to become the fifth Husker to win the award and the first since 1997. Nebraska's five Lombardi awards are the second-most by one school in the 40-year history of the award, trailing only Ohio State's six Lombardi Award winners.

- Suh became the fourth Husker to sweep the Lombardi and Outland in the same season, joining Rich Glover (1972), Dave Rimington (1982) and Dean Steinkuhler (1983). Overall, Suh is just the 12th player to capture the Outland and Lombardi in the same season, with the only other player to do so since 1996 being LSU defensive tackle Glenn Dorsey in 2007 (also coached by Bo Pelini).

- Suh made a clean sweep of the national defensive player-of-the-year awards by winning the Chuck Bednarik Award and the Bronko Nagurski Trophy. Suh is the first Husker to receive both of those awards, and he became just the fifth player to sweep those two awards, most recently Miami's Dan Morgan in 2000.

-I n addition to the awards he won, Suh was also a finalist for the Walter Camp Player of the Year and the Lott Trophy.

- Suh was named the Big 12 Defensive Player of the Year by the league's coaches and every major outlet that chose a defender of the year. He was the first defensive player to win Big 12 Player-of-the-Year honors since Grant Wistrom in 1996 and 1997.

- Suh was one of 12 players who were unanimous All-America selections by being named to all five of the All-America teams that are recognized by the NCAA. Suh is the first unanimous All-American for Nebraska since Aaron Tayor in 1997.

     As a senior, Suh led Nebraska in tackles for the second straight season with 85 tackles, the most by a defensive lineman since 1974. He also became the first defensive lineman to lead Nebraska in tackles in consecutive seasons. He also led the team in tackles for loss (24), sacks (12), quarterback hurries (26) and blocked kicks (3). His 24 tackles for loss were second on the Nebraska season list, while his 12 sacks ranked third in school history. Suh's 10 pass breakups were second on the team and led the nation's defensive linemen. He also added his fourth career interception, an NU record for defensive linemen.

     Suh left Nebraska with his name prominently displayed in the Cornhusker record book.

- Suh had 57 career tackles for loss, good for the No. 2 spot on the list, just behind Grant Wistrom's school-record 58.5 tackles for loss.

- His 24 career sacks are tied for fourth in Nebraska history.

- He finished with 215 career tackles to rank 24th on the Nebraska career list. He ranked fourth among interior defensive linemen in career tackles.

- His 15 career breakups were also a position record, bettering the 11 by Steve Warren (1996-99).

- Suh had at least one tackle for loss in 21 of his final 25 games, including 12 of 14 games as a senior.

- He made at least five total tackles in 15 of his final 20 games.

- The two blocked kicks against Iowa State tied a Nebraska single-game record for any player and was a position record for defensive linemen. His three blocked kicks for the season were a position record, bettering his own two blocks in 2008.

- Suh's six career blocked kicks were a record for defensive linemen and were one shy of the school record for blocked kicks by any player.

 Suh's Career Statistics

 

 

Tackles

  

 

Fum

  

 

 

QB

Year

G/S

UT

AT

TT

TFL

Sacks

C-R

BK

PBU

PI

Hry.

2005*

2/0

0

1

1

0-0

0

0-0

0

0

0

0

2006

14/1

12

7

19

8-45

3.5-37

1-0

0

0

1

2

2007

12/11

22

12

34

6-29

1-6

0-1

1

2

0

4

2008

13/13

39

37

76

19-85

7.5-67

1-0

2

3

2

6

2009

14/14

52

31

85

24-93

12-77

1-0

3

10

1

26

Totals

55/39

125

90

215

57-252

24-187

3-1

6

15

4

38

  *Suh was granted a medical hardship following the 2005 season and regained a year of eligibility